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International Human Rights

Human Rights Understanding International Law

In 2014 while developing a program for our organization to provide diplomatic status for our international cooperation ambassadors we stumbled upon the existence of a legal state of being that exceeds the ideals of freedom and liberty plainly written in the law and under further development under the convention of the Global Citizenship Commission which had begun convening at York University in Scotland under Gordon Brown who is also the United Nations special Head of Global Education. The results delivered by the Global Citizenship Commission meetings resulted in the rewrite of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Providing Detailed Information About Human Liberty, Life, Freedom, and Civil Sustainability

The following links connect directly with the Open Book Publishers site where the document was first released on April 18th, 2016. The information presented here is the new basis for human rights globally in all nations that ratified the United Nations governed declaration since 1948.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights for the 21st Century (Neo-Citizenship)

Glossary

ix

Introduction by Gordon Brown

1

Preface by Paul Boghossian

7

Acknowledgments

9

Executive Summary

13

Preamble

25

1.

The Long and Influential Life of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

29

1.1

History of the UDHR

29

1.2

Affirming and protecting the UDHR

31

1.3

The changing context

32

1.4

The enduring relevance of the UDHR

32

1.5

Legal status

34

1.6

Foundational principles

35

1.7

Universality

36

1.8

Interconnectivity of rights

38

2.

The Evolving Understanding of Rights

39

2.1

Rights of members of specific groups

40

a.

The rights of women

40

b.

The rights of children

41

c.

The rights of the disabled, including the profoundly disabled

43

d.

Rights related to sexual orientation

44

e.

The rights of prisoners

45

2.2

Rights of groups as such

46

a.

The right to national self-determination, including regional autonomy and subsidiarity

46

b.

The rights of indigenous peoples

47

c.

Ethnic cleansing

47

d.

The rights of peoples prejudiced at the national or communal level by climate change

47

2.3

Rights related to other issues involving vital interests

48

a.

Migration

48

b.

Statelessness

50

c.

Administrative justice

51

d.

Corruption

51

e.

Privacy from state or corporate electronic surveillance

52

f.

Access to the Internet and electronic communication on a global scale

53

g.

Extreme poverty and deep economic inequality

53

h.

Healthcare

54

i.

A safe, clean, healthy, and sustainable environment

55

2.4

An open task

56

3.

Limitations and Derogations

57

3.1

Adequacy of Article 29 account of limitations

57

3.2

Derogation of rights in national or international emergencies

59

3.3

Regulation of the use of force

60

4.

Social and Economic Rights

63

4.1

The importance of social and economic rights

63

4.2

Relation to availability of resources

65

4.3

Responsibilities for social and economic rights

66

4.4

Poverty reduction and other human rights

69

5.

Responsibility for Human Rights

71

5.1

The special role of states

72

5.2

Other entities

73

a.

Sub-national governments

74

b.

International institutions

74

c.

Corporations

74

d.

Private persons

76

5.3

Responsibilities of rights-bearers

77

5.4

No closed model of responsibility

79

6.

Implementation of Human Rights

81

6.1

Introduction

81

6.2

State of play on representative rights

82

a.

Anti-slavery (Article 4)

83

b.

Anti-torture (Article 5)

84

c.

Free expression (Article 19) and free association (Article 20)

86

d.

Education (Article 26)

88

e.

Summary

90

6.3

Suggestions on implementation

91

a.

Recommendations for strengthening the UN system on human rights implementation

91

i.

Implement the recommendations of UN human rights mechanisms

91

ii.

Enhance the OHCHR’s field presence

92

iii.

Raise human rights concerns for consideration by the UN Security Council

93

iv.

Limit the UN Security Council veto in the case of mass atrocities

94

v.

Harness technology to enhance human rights accountability

94

b.

National and regional legal systems

95

c.

NGOs

97

d.

Human rights education

97

i.

The UDHR and human rights education for all

97

ii.

The UDHR and human rights education since 1948

98

iii.

Transformative human rights education

99

iv.

Advancing transformative human rights education

99

6.4

Sovereignty

100

a.

General (human rights as limits on sovereignty)

100

b.

Sanctions, denunciations, and other measures

101

c.

Responsibility to Protect

102

7.

Human Rights and a Global Ethic

105

Appendices

109

A

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

109

B

Members of the Commission

117

C

Members of the Philosophers' Committee

131

Online Appendices

D

Human Rights Education

E

Human Rights Implementation

To view this document in PDF you can view it in our unsecured document library or get a copy in PDF from the publisher's website which this contents page links to.